Expertise

Research in the Earley laboratory centers around animal behavior and the diverse mechanisms that underlie remarkable levels of behavioral variation among individuals of a population.  The vast majority of our work involves fishes, and fuses field observations of behavior and ecology with laboratory studies on hormones, metabolism, gene expression, and neurobiology.

In the mangrove ecosystems of south Florida and the Caribbean, we study the mangrove rivulus – a self-fertilizing hermaphroditic fish with extraordinary sexual habits and unique population architecture.

Research interests also include:

  • Endocrine and metabolic correlates of performance in aggressive contests.
  • Neuroendocrine mechanisms of experience-dependent changes in behavior.
  • Assessment strategies employed by animals during aggressive contests.
  • Social eavesdropping, audience effects, and winner-loser effects.
  • Adaptive value of carotenoid-based color and mechanisms underlying flexible expression.   
  • Developmental plasticity and adult phenotypic flexibility of life history, endocrine, and behavioral traits
  • Gene x environment interactions and the evolution of integrated phenotypes.
  • Social, endocrine, and genomic mechanisms of environmental sex determination and sex change.
  • Seasonal and diurnal fluctuations in steroid hormone concentrations.
  • Parasites as drivers of behavioral variation; evolutionary implications
  • Non-invasive hormone sampling in fishes and amphibians.

Expertise:

  • Computational and Quantitative Biology and Bioinformatics
  • Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, and Conservation Biology
  • Integrative Organismal Biology

We investigate the neurobiological, hormonal, genetic and physiological mechanisms underlying the expression of diverse phenotypes, mostly those that arise through environment-genotype interactions. We manipulate the social and physical environments (including salinity, temperature, and exposure to pollutants) and examine phenotypic endpoints including behavior, life history, and sex.

We examine the evolution of multivariate phenotypes using a combination of field sampling, phenotyping, and quantitative genetics. We also examine the evolution of mixed mating systems (selfing + outcrossing) and sex change across the enormous geographical range of our study organism, the mangrove rivulus fish.

Affiliations

Associate Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, University of Alabama

School of Fisheries, Aquaculture and Aquatic Sciences, College of Agriculture, Auburn University

Past Affiliations

School of Fisheries, Aquaculture and Aquatic Sciences, College of Agriculture, Auburn University

Center for Behavioral Neuroscience, Emory University (past)

Assistant Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, University of Alabama (past)

Communities
Biological Science
Degrees
PhD, University of Louisville, Biology, 2002
Master, University of Louisville, Environmental Biology, 2001
BS, Syracuse University, Biology, 1997
Keywords
biological sciences